Self Care When You're Sick

Photo by  Kelly Sikkema  on  Unsplash

Photo by Kelly Sikkema on Unsplash

Over the past week or so, I’ve had flu-like symptoms. My physician indicated it was post-nasal drip, which is annoying as hell.

When you’re way under the weather, your motivation takes a significant hit, and your energy levels are way lower than you’re used to.

When you’re a driven individual, that’s constantly moving things forward on a daily basis, getting sick is a rude interruption to your goals. You think about your to do list, but have no energy to even write a blog post, much less work on anything.

That’s been my week.

Prior to my 369 Days, whenever I was ill, I wouldn’t take the time to rest and recover. I would push through the illness, continuing to work and pushing aside the desire to rest.

Not the best strategy. It’s a prescription for burnout.

Thankfully I rarely come down with colds, or the flu, because of the pre-emptive measures I use to keep my health:

  • Get 7-8 hours of restful sleep every night

  • Dress appropriately for the weather. Canada winters have significant temperature swings, so don’t be bold and go out without a jacket

  • Saline Nasal Rinse. This has been a life saver for me

  • Exercise regularly. Keeping active keeps your immune system working

  • Eat real food. Listen to my podcast interview with Chris Marshall to learn more

  • Minimize stress. Meditation, mindfulness, plenty of ways to help

This time around I’m not beating myself up for not getting things done that I want to do. I’m resting and doing things when the energy is there, and resting when the energy is nowhere to be found. And that’s ok.

The work will be there when I’m better. Don’t beat yourself up over it. Your body is telling you it needs to recover. Help your body out by allowing that to happen.


Follow me on Twitter @bfastleadership, Facebook Breakfast Leadership, and on Instagram @bfastleadership

I help people recover from or prevent burnout in their lives.  Register here for my next webinar on going from burnout to your ideal life.

My 2019 Program on Burnout Recovery Coaching is HERE!




Pre-Emptive Strike Leadership: The Stand-In

Your employees’ relationship with people who have power over them in the organization will always include “stand-ins” – that is, the unseen presence of influential people who have held power over them at some point in their lives.  Given the significance of relationships that people have with others in their lives, starting with childhood, those relationships that represented the greatest threat to them emotionally will be the ones that become the “stand in” in the workplace.  The power dynamic that is necessarily present in the workplace is what creates the “trigger” for the insertion of the “stand in”.  Managers, executives, HR representatives all “stand in” for the unseen influences carried in the door by employees.  

Managers, in particular, are holding power at the front lines of our organizations.  They are the ones employees interact with most often and who have direct control over many aspects of the employee’s life.  Power dynamics are at their most concentrated here for employees, and the way in which staff will interpret interactions with managers has a great deal to do with who the managers are “standing in” for in their employees’ lives.  An unsavvy and oblivious manager can end up generating a host of negative and unproductive reactions on the part of the employee that are often completely unrelated to the manager but, unfortunately, still their responsibility.  

Learn more at PreEmptiveStrikeConsulting.com

How Your Patience impacts your stress levels, and how to stop stressin'

Photo by  Cody Black  on  Unsplash

Photo by Cody Black on Unsplash

Whenever you’re going through a season of stressful situations, the chances for burnout and stress are high. You feel like a piñata, either in work and/or in life. Nothing is going right for you. You may feel the world is against you.

I know how you feel. I’ve experienced this in my career, and I can empathize with you that it is not a walk in the park.

However, you don’t have to let it break you down. You are in control of your mind, your thoughts, your reactions, and how you navigate through this thing we call life.

Burnout is a state that I want everyone to avoid, because you lose your ability to enjoy life when you’re burned out. Nothing feels right or good. You’re almost numb to the things that brought you joy. That’s not fun for anyone, your family, friends, co-workers, etc.

When you’re in one of those seasons where it’s “you v. the world”, there’s one key trait that will serve you well:

Patience

Axl Rose sang about it, The Oxford Dictionary defines patience as The capacity to accept or tolerate delay, problems, or suffering without becoming annoyed or anxious.

  • Anxiety can lead to stress and burnout

  • Being tolerate reduces stress and burnout from happening, with the right mindset

  • Suffering leads to stress and burnout

  • Being annoyed can lead to stress and burnout

How do you become more patient? An article in Inc. Magazine gives us some clues:

  • Wait for things instead of instant gratification.

  • Stop doing things that are not important in your work and your life

  • Be more aware of things that cause you to be impatient. Eliminate those things if at all possible

  • Relax and take deep breaths


Follow me on Twitter @bfastleadership, Facebook Breakfast Leadership, and on Instagram @bfastleadership

I help people recover from or prevent burnout in their lives.  Register here for my next webinar on going from burnout to your ideal life.

My 2019 Program on Burnout Recovery Coaching is HERE!



How You Pausing To Reflect Can Prevent Burnout

Photo by  Kylo  on  Unsplash

Photo by Kylo on Unsplash

Life has a way of providing many triumphs, struggles, victories, losses, ups, and downs. How you think about these life experiences will dictate how your future will look.

Too often we live our lives on auto-pilot, going through the motions, not taking time to smell the flowers (not all of us like roses), take in nature, or simply just be. We jump from activity to activity without pausing and reflecting “what just happened to me?”.

When was the last time you reflected on an experience you’ve recently had? Some call this a debrief, as what you would do in any project management exercise. What went well? What went sideways? Did we learn anything new? Did any of our past theories help (or hurt) this project?

We can use that methodology when we reflect on life experiences as well. Public speakers can reflect on what went well during your talk? What did you forget to do? Did you feel the audience was engaged, or were they suffering from after-lunch food coma?

Parents after having a difficult discussion with your child. What went well (if anything)?, did your child seem to understand your point of view? Did you listen (truly listen) to your child’s responses? Were you in the moment, or were you rehashing the past, or re-living the past of an experience you had as a child?

Check yourself.

Pausing and reflection on your daily lives helps you summarize the experiences, looking for ways to improve how you conduct your life, as well as minimize any negative self-talk about mistakes and/or things that didn’t go as you would have hoped or planned.

The sun still rises (even during winter, and it’s hidden by clouds, it’s still there.)

I’m a huge fan of journals. I encourage you journal your days, so you can look for personal growth opportunities, as well as notice trends as to how your days and weeks are going.

Here’s a reflection journal exercise:

  • Write what went really well today. Be as detailed as you want. You’ll look back at this from time to time, so you’ll want to be verbose here.

  • Write what went “bad” or didn’t go as you would have hoped/liked/planned. List the experience(s) and also write down what your role was in these matters, but don’t beat yourself up. Write it from a factual standpoint.

  • Write down what you want to accomplish tomorrow. Be BOLD. Set big objectives/goals, but ones that you feel you can achieve, or at minimum move forward.

Use your journal daily. Writing it down celebrates what went well, what didn’t, and what positive things you’ll do tomorrow. It provides you a way to release everything that happened in your day, so that you can get a restful evening of sleep, which is a crucial burnout prevention step.


Follow me on Twitter @bfastleadership, Facebook Breakfast Leadership, and on Instagram @bfastleadership

I help people recover from or prevent burnout in their lives.  Register here for my next webinar on going from burnout to your ideal life.

My 2019 Program on Burnout Recovery Coaching is HERE!

Why Am I Burned Out?

Choice. Burnout is a choice. You chose it.

Now before you click to another tab on your browser (or close your browser altogether) in hatred for me, let me explain why you chose to be burned out.

First, I highly doubt you intended to burn yourself out. That would require some very deeply rooted self-harm thoughts and patterns, and if that’s the case, I highly encourage you seek help immediately.

In the book Disease To Please by Harriet Braiker, many of us have this desire to please others, and often times we put ourselves last, in order to do this.

  • We do too much, too often for others,

  • We almost never say no when someone asks something of us

  • We suck (like I did) at delegation

  • We become overwhelmed and spread our lives too thin

In our “Disease To Please Syndrome”, we often act to avoid fear, conflict, rejection, and confrontation. Here’s the wrinkle: Avoiding fears only causes them to intensify. Avoiding conflict creates more internal conflict.

Constantly pleasing others basically turns a deaf ear to your inner voice, so you ignore your own personal needs and desires. This causes internal stress, anxiety, depression, and other health challenges, which ultimately leads to, you guessed it: Burnout.

How do you fix these things?

Kill the “Shoulds”

I should help that person going through a personal tragedy. I should spend 20 minutes listening to that person complain about her work life, when they won’t actually do anything about it personally, because they’re doing their own avoidance exercise.

In both of these examples, you are taking on the burden of others. Noble? Yes. Stupid? Definitely. Be a sympathetic listener, give suggestions, but stop lifting their baggage.

Adjust Your Thinking Chair

Steve from Blues Clues had a thinking chair, that he sat in when he was solving mysteries with his dog Blue. Your thinking leads to burnout. Your thought patterns go to “worst-case scenario” mode as a default. Quoting the Bob Newhart skit on Mad TV: STOP IT!

Your thinking patterns need to be rational, reasoned, and accurate as possible, but please, please, please reduce the emotions and feelings you attach to your thoughts. Blame your amygdala!

People Should Treat Me This Way

As Braiker stated in Disease To Please, Holding on to conditional beliefs about how people should behave towards you, based on “all that you do/have done” for them, only sets you up for disappointment, resentment, anger, hurt. It also can create disillusions about other people as well.

In my book Pre-Emptive Strike Leadership, that I co-authored with Dr. Arlene Battishill, we often associate people with “Stand-ins”, or people that remind us of someone else. Your boss could remind you of your Dad, who wasn’t there for you, or didn’t give you the love you expected. Or your co-worker could be a stand-in or remind you of someone you worked with years ago, that “stole” your girlfriend.

Summary

If you’re burned out, it didn’t happen overnight. There isn’t a magic pill, a get more sleep post, etc. that will immediately cure you. It took time for burnout to appear, and it will take time to undo what created your burnout in the first place.

Follow me on social media (typically @bfastleadership for the social media channels), implement the suggestions I post and share, and reach out to me, to get the guidance to rid yourself of burnout, and learn the techniques I use to prevent burnout from happening again.

Be well!


Follow me on Twitter @bfastleadership, Facebook Breakfast Leadership, and on Instagram @bfastleadership

I help people recover from or prevent burnout in their lives.  Register here for my next webinar on going from burnout to your ideal life.

My 2019 Program on Burnout Recovery Coaching is HERE!


Time Management Strategies for Solopreneurs

[image: https://pixabay.com/en/notebook-work-girl-computer-woman-2386034/]  Being a solopreneur is a busy life. It can often seem like you are rushing from one task or obligation to the next without enough time to get it all done.  While it is common for small business owners to have busy days and long hours, you should be doing what you can to manage your time more effectively. That might mean  joining a coworking space  so you can focus better, outsourcing certain tasks, or simply organizing your days differently. The following are a few strategies that can help solopreneurs who are having trouble fitting all of their work into the time they have.   Pick a Time Management System   One of the best ways to make the most of your days is to find a system for time management. For some people, it might be as simple as using a time management app, but there are several  time management systems  that can be beneficial. You don’t even need to pick one and follow it precisely. You can look at different time management systems and take from them the elements that work for you. The key is to find or develop a system and then stick to it.   Know Your Goals   It will be much easier to manage your time when you know what you are trying to achieve. Identify both short-term and long term goals that can help you get your business where you want it to be. Once you know what these goals are, you can then start breaking them down into steps that will help you achieve them. With that knowledge, you can focus your time on the steps that will move you closer to your goals.   Set Your Priorities   Like most solopreneurs, you probably find that there are many days that end with a few tasks left on your list. This can feel frustrating, but it should only be seen as a problem if those leftover tasks are important, time-sensitive issues that really needed to be completed that day. To prevent this type of problem, you should evaluate your daily to-do list and identify the items that have to be checked off before you call it a day. When you know what these items are, you can schedule them for your most productive hours.   Follow Your Productivity   If you are like most people, you are not at your best 24 hours a day. You probably have hours where your productivity peaks and parts of the day when you feel like it lags. If you want to get the most from your time, you need to know  how to identify your most productive time of the day . When you know when you are most motivated, you can schedule your high-priority items to be completed when you are doing your best work.   Track Your Time   You might already track your time if you bill hours to clients, but you should start tracking all of your time. With a good  time tracking tool , you can gain an overview of how you spend your days. This information can then be used to help you manage your time better. You might notice a lot of wasted time in your schedule or tasks that are taking longer than they should. Once you see these problems, you can start working on ways to address them.   Focus on the Current Day   It is good to set long-term goals and there are significant benefits to scheduling an entire week or month in advance. However, when you are actually working on the things you schedule, you need to focus on the current day. If you are constantly thinking about tomorrow or next week, you are not truly present for the things you are working on in the moment. Without that focus on the current day, you can’t manage your time efficiently, and it will set you back.  Finding a way to balance your daily tasks can seem intimidating as a solopreneur, but the trick is simply to get organized. Clearly outlining what needs to get done and when is an effective way to ensure the tasks that will help you reach your goals are done to the best of your ability.     Rae is a graduate of Tufts University with a combined International Relations and Chinese degree. After spending time living and working abroad in China, she returned to NYC to pursue her career and continue curating quality content. Rae is passionate about travel, food, and writing, of course.

[image: https://pixabay.com/en/notebook-work-girl-computer-woman-2386034/]

Being a solopreneur is a busy life. It can often seem like you are rushing from one task or obligation to the next without enough time to get it all done.

While it is common for small business owners to have busy days and long hours, you should be doing what you can to manage your time more effectively. That might mean joining a coworking space so you can focus better, outsourcing certain tasks, or simply organizing your days differently. The following are a few strategies that can help solopreneurs who are having trouble fitting all of their work into the time they have.

Pick a Time Management System

One of the best ways to make the most of your days is to find a system for time management. For some people, it might be as simple as using a time management app, but there are several time management systems that can be beneficial. You don’t even need to pick one and follow it precisely. You can look at different time management systems and take from them the elements that work for you. The key is to find or develop a system and then stick to it.

Know Your Goals

It will be much easier to manage your time when you know what you are trying to achieve. Identify both short-term and long term goals that can help you get your business where you want it to be. Once you know what these goals are, you can then start breaking them down into steps that will help you achieve them. With that knowledge, you can focus your time on the steps that will move you closer to your goals.

Set Your Priorities

Like most solopreneurs, you probably find that there are many days that end with a few tasks left on your list. This can feel frustrating, but it should only be seen as a problem if those leftover tasks are important, time-sensitive issues that really needed to be completed that day. To prevent this type of problem, you should evaluate your daily to-do list and identify the items that have to be checked off before you call it a day. When you know what these items are, you can schedule them for your most productive hours.

Follow Your Productivity

If you are like most people, you are not at your best 24 hours a day. You probably have hours where your productivity peaks and parts of the day when you feel like it lags. If you want to get the most from your time, you need to know how to identify your most productive time of the day. When you know when you are most motivated, you can schedule your high-priority items to be completed when you are doing your best work.

Track Your Time

You might already track your time if you bill hours to clients, but you should start tracking all of your time. With a good time tracking tool, you can gain an overview of how you spend your days. This information can then be used to help you manage your time better. You might notice a lot of wasted time in your schedule or tasks that are taking longer than they should. Once you see these problems, you can start working on ways to address them.

Focus on the Current Day

It is good to set long-term goals and there are significant benefits to scheduling an entire week or month in advance. However, when you are actually working on the things you schedule, you need to focus on the current day. If you are constantly thinking about tomorrow or next week, you are not truly present for the things you are working on in the moment. Without that focus on the current day, you can’t manage your time efficiently, and it will set you back.

Finding a way to balance your daily tasks can seem intimidating as a solopreneur, but the trick is simply to get organized. Clearly outlining what needs to get done and when is an effective way to ensure the tasks that will help you reach your goals are done to the best of your ability.



Rae is a graduate of Tufts University with a combined International Relations and Chinese degree. After spending time living and working abroad in China, she returned to NYC to pursue her career and continue curating quality content. Rae is passionate about travel, food, and writing, of course.

Rae Steinbach

Rae Steinbach


Follow me on Twitter @bfastleadership, Facebook Breakfast Leadership, and on Instagram @bfastleadership

I help people recover from or prevent burnout in their lives.  Register here for my next webinar on going from burnout to your ideal life.

My 2019 Program on Burnout Recovery Coaching is HERE!

Your Burnout Is NOT A Failure

Photo by  Zohre Nemati  on  Unsplash

In the book “Burn-out” by Herbert Freudenberger, Dr. Freudenberger realized in his studies that burnout is robbing our society of high-achievers (both women and men) that society looks up to as leaders and action-takers.

I see many people that are burned out tend to be the Type-A personalities: driven, successful, but also not satisfied with their accomplishments ,so they keep chasing more and more.

This chasing leads to burnout. Burnout feelings often have a dulling and deadness feeling within. Things that used to excite us no longer do. We are often numb to the world.

Sound familiar? Am I talking about you right now?

If you said yes (either out loud, or you whispered to yourself, then you’ve taken a huge step in admitting you have an issue, and you deep down want to fix it.

Now that you have acknowledged that you may be burned out, the next key step is to stop the bleeding.

You need to pause what you’re doing and do a simple breathing exercise for 2 minutes. Not 30, not 45, two minutes.

If you are in a place where you can close your eyes, do so. if not, find a place where you can be safe and without interruption for 2 minutes.

Close your eyes. Breathe in for 4 seconds. Hold your breath for four seconds. Exhale for 4 seconds. Pause for 4 seconds. Breathe in for 4 seconds, hold for 4 seconds, exhale for 4 seconds. Pause for 4 seconds.

Repeat above for 2 minutes. Set an alarm or timer on your phone if you need to.

After this 2 minutes, feel how you feel. My hunch is that you’re a bit more relaxed than before. This is good. This demonstrates that you can unwind a little, and in 2 minutes.

Implement this breath work throughout your day. I recommend at morning, mid-day, and evening before you go to bed. For the bedtime exercise, don’t set an alarm (also don’t have your phone in your bedroom. If you use it for an alarm clock, STOP!)

Burnout is not a failure on your part. You are a driven, giving person and you want the best for others. Unfortunately, you forgot to take care of yourself, first. I get it. I was the same way, then my 369 Days hit, and wow did that cause a ripple effect.


Follow me on Twitter @bfastleadership, Facebook Breakfast Leadership, and on Instagram @bfastleadership

I help people recover from or prevent burnout in their lives.  Register here for my next webinar on going from burnout to your ideal life.

My 2019 Program on Burnout Recovery Coaching is HERE!




Why People Deny They Are Burned Out

Source: Photo by  whoislimos  on  Unsplash

Source: Photo by whoislimos on Unsplash

A decade ago, I was the poster child for being burned out. I had all the symptoms:

  • Fatigue

  • Restlessness

  • Insomnia

  • Anger Management Issues

  • Irritable

  • Mistake prone

  • Relationship challenges

  • Physical challenges

  • Bad Eating Habits

That list isn’t all inclusive, but I had all of the above, and then some. Everyone knew I was burned out, except me. Maybe subconsciously I knew, but on the surface, this Type A personality would have nothing to do with burnout.

I was in my 3rd year of running a medical clinic, which never really got past the “start-up” feel, mostly because we didn’t have a set parameter on when we would “arrive.” Our clinic was supposed to have a new building (which they did get, at least a 1/2 decade after my 369 Days kick off.)

I was in full-on “get er done” mode, and never let up. Not resting or taking a break, my body eventually did break, and it kicked off my year of worst-case scenarios.

I was beyond foolish back then, not prioritizing myself first, and focusing on pleasing others before me. It nearly cost me my life. Never again.

Why did I deny my own burnout?

Common reasons include:

  • People pleasing. You are prideful about your accomplishments, and you’ve likely rose through the ranks of employment, and are viewed as an all-star employee. You enjoy that designation, and don’t want to let anyone down, nor lose that view that people have of you

  • Adrenaline kicks in: When you’re accomplishing much, you get excited and invigorated (and addicted) to the emotions you feel when you’re accomplishing great things. However you don’t take time to “smell the roses”.

  • You ignore the signs. Burnout does not happen overnight. It’s not like you wake up tomorrow and say “oh crap, I’m burned out today.” Burnout creeps up slowly over time, but when it hits, you’ll hit the mat faster than being on the receiving end of a Mike Tyson hook.

Ignoring your build up to burnout will cost you. It could cost you your health, your job, your relationships, you name it.

If you are stressed out and feeling aches and pains in parts of your body you didn’t know you had, you need to reach out to me. I don’t want you to have a year of worst-case scenarios like I did.


Follow me on Twitter @bfastleadership, Facebook Breakfast Leadership, and on Instagram @bfastleadership

I help people recover from or prevent burnout in their lives.  Register here for my next webinar on going from burnout to your ideal life.

My 2019 Program on Burnout Recovery Coaching is HERE!





Pre-Emptive Strike Leadership: The Hallmark of a Pre-Emptive Strike Leader

A revolution is required in leadership that recognizes the time is upon us and we must respond to a workforce that is very different from the ones that have come before.  True leadership will recognize the sea change and take advantage of the opportunity to transform their organizations in ways that will leave them thriving for decades to come.

The behavior that engenders the emotionally safest workplace for employees is one where the person in charge leads as a steward, rather than as an executive or manager.  True leaders operate from a place of understanding human behavior and interpersonal relationships; they foster and facilitate communication and interactions that are open and welcoming.  Leaders make decisions that consider the whole, and not just the pieces.  Leaders model behavior that communicates to everyone that they are valued.  Leaders don’t manage people; they motivate them. Leaders take a bottom-up approach instead of top-down.  Leaders are not rigid or myopic and do not demand structure and compliance.  Leaders take the long view and recognize that to create a culture of emotional safety is to create an organization that has the least risk, liability, cost and distraction.

So, ask yourself the question - what kind of leader are you?

Learn more at PreEmptiveStrikeConsulting.com

Pre-Emptive Strike Leadership: Dealing With Triggered Employees

When it comes to dealing with employee behavior, organizations are still in the era of being responsive rather than being proactive.  It will only be at the point where a problem with an employee surfaces that the manager or executive will take note.  The manager or executive almost never spend any time in advance addressing the early indications that a problem is taking root, nor do they identify previous patterns of negative employee behavior in a department or across the organization.  It is always a matter of dealing with the individual once they can no longer be ignored.  

Consider that management and HR responses to negative behavior among employees are often short-sighted and lack any deep thinking or conversations with the employee about why they are behaving the way they are (because there are no resources available or structures in place that would assist them to have such conversations). Add to this the common organizational culture of dismissing problematic employees with simplistic labels such as “lazy”, “not team players”, “troublesome” or “selfish”.  These are all ways of placing the blame on the flawed character of the employee who does not merit the time or resources for a deeper exploration of what may be going on.  It also betrays the organization’s contempt for employees who have anything going on in their lives that might interfere with their job performance, and their willful blindness around triggers that may be coming from the organization and leadership team.  

 When it comes to dealing with the behavior, most organizations engage with their employees in a punitive way. Almost all organizations respond in similar ways, including: 

·       Management and HR meeting with the employee(s) to scold them and instruct them to stop misbehaving.  

·       After several verbal discussions, HR will then go to the Policies and Procedures Handbook and start “writing up” the employee for their actions.  

·       If the employee is still acting out, then the infamous “Performance Improvement Plan” aka “PIP” gets rolled out.  (When an employee is put on a PIP, that is a red flag moment indicating that HR is setting a path to dehire the employee).  Many of these PIPs have obligations and targets that even the most steadfast employee would have a hard time meeting.

Learn more at PreEmptiveStrikeConsulting.com

Pre-Emptive Strike Leadership: Window of Tolerance

Window of Tolerance by Dr. Dan Siegel

Window of Tolerance by Dr. Dan Siegel

Imagine you are in a small, tight room about the size of a closet.  The only ventilation in the room is in the form of a small window that is open, filling the closet with fresh air that makes the cramped space somehow tolerable. Now, picture the window slowly closing. Imagine the way it becomes more difficult to breathe with every inch of open window you are losing.  By the time the window is almost closed, the room is stifling and you are gasping for air.  You might even feel yourself panicking, kind of like getting trapped in an elevator.  

The longer you are in that room struggling to breathe, the more irrational you become.  You’ll find you’re telling yourself stories about the danger you’re in, the loss that you’re going to experience, that no one is there to help you, that you’re completely alone with the craziness you feel inside and if you don’t get out immediately, you’re going to lose your mind. Ultimately what you’re feeling is that your very sense of survival is being threatened.  

Even if someone is in that room with you, the more they talk to you in a rational way, the more you want to attack them because you’re in such a state of fear that they now become the enemy. And, as with all enemies, they must be defeated and you’ll do anything to eliminate whatever is causing the extreme distress you’re feeling.

This is the image that illustrates a person’s window of tolerance.  This is where adversity and stress clash at their worst.  It’s what triggers the well-known “fight or flight” reaction in an individual – meaning a person is likely to flee the situation, become confrontational, or act in a way that is detrimental to everyone around them because, for them, they feel as if they are literally fighting for their life.

Learn more at PreEmptiveStrikeConsulting.com

How Insomnia and Burnout Are Closely Related

Insomnia is something that many people suffer from on an annual basis. Sleep seems like an impossibility for some, and it has long-lasting impact on your life.

Insomnia symptoms may include: Source of list from Mayo Clinic

  • Difficulty falling asleep at night

  • Waking up during the night

  • Waking up too early

  • Not feeling well-rested after a night's sleep

  • Daytime tiredness or sleepiness

  • Irritability, depression or anxiety

  • Difficulty paying attention, focusing on tasks or remembering

  • Increased errors or accidents

  • Ongoing worries about sleep (so ironic. Worrying about sleep can cause you to not sleep)

The symptoms above mimic burnout conditions. When you are burned out, your brain is so focused on addressing the damage that stress and burnout is causing on your body, that your body doesn’t have the energy to rest. Let me repeat that.

Under stress and burnout, your body doesn’t have enough energy to rest.

One of the symptoms mentioned above (waking up during the night) is a huge issue in the prevention of restful sleep. An article from Practical Pain Management discusses potential causes of disturbed sleep, and introduces CBT as a possible option for treatment.

Burnout is caused by many factors, but a lack of restful sleep in your life is a huge contributor. If you can’t rest, everything will tumble like a house of playing cards.

If you’re struggling with burnout, I want to help you get your life back. Click HERE to schedule a call with me to see how we can help you recover from burnout, and live the life you want and DESERVE!


Follow me on Twitter @bfastleadership, Facebook Breakfast Leadership, and on Instagram @bfastleadership

I help people recover from or prevent burnout in their lives.  Register here for my next webinar on going from burnout to your ideal life.

My 2019 Program on Burnout Recovery Coaching is HERE!





Pre-Emptive Strike Leadership: Unpacking The Invisible Baggage of Your Employees

Employees carry invisible baggage through the door with them every day.  Packed inside are the external stressors of life, expectations and fantasies about their job, and their history with power.  The contents of this invisible baggage influence an employee’s reactions and behavior in the workplace.  The contents may be invisible, but rest assured that there are a lot of visible clues to this baggage if you know what you’re looking for.  Let’s start by unpacking the invisible bags.  

 SMUGGLING CONTRABAND PERSONAL STRESS INTO THE WORKPLACE

 If you are alive, then you know that life is complicated and seems to be growing ever more so at an increasingly rapid rate.  Employees have an extraordinary number of external stressors that they carry with them into the workplace on a daily basis.  

 The stressors that employees are experiencing fall into one of three categories: (1) trauma; (2) stress; and (3) irritation.  Dealing with loved ones who are dying would fall into the trauma category. The struggles of being a single parent fall into the stress category.  Dealing with rude drivers and traffic both fall into the irritation category.  It can be tempting to dismiss “irritation stress”, but we all know the irritation associated with driving can actually represent a significant stress upon arriving at work.  

In Melanie Gordon Sheets’ book Out-of-Control: A Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) - Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) Workbook for Getting Control of Our Emotions and Emotion-Driven Behavior, she identifies an extensive list of common stressors that are assaulting the population (this means your employees). Some items include: (For a full list, please order Pre-Emptive Strike Leadership!)

  • Challenges with their children

  • Difficult co-workers

  • Loved ones away at war/military service

  • Marital or relationship stress

  • Bad memories of the past

  • Daily hassles

  • Struggles of being a single parent

  • Stress

  • Inconvenience

  • Transportation issues (car breaks down, transit late or out of service making them late)

  • Stress from significant life changes

  • Not having enough time to accomplish what they want to do

  • Affording medications

Every single one of your employees is dealing with multiple stressors EVERY DAY.  It is their inescapable reality and, according to research, the less power and financial security one has, the greater the impact of each of these stressors.

Pre-Emptive Strike Leadership. Order TODAY!

Pre-Emptive Strike Leadership. Order TODAY!


Stress in your employees’ personal lives is very real, complicated and playing out in myriad ways in their workplace, made all the more volatile because it must remain hidden.  The higher the stress, the higher the stakes. If the workplace environment is one that invalidates personal stress or emphasizes to employees that there’s no place for it at work, employees are much more likely to overreact to authority, nurse grudges, generate divisive environments, and look for outlets to release the building pressure.  

Learn more at PreEmptiveStrikeConsulting.com